Harry and Meghan ban British tabloids from working with them

Prince Harry and his wife Meghan have told four British national newspapers they will “never work with them again”.

The couple, who recently moved to LA after ending their Royal duties, sent a stiffly worded letter to the editors of The Sun, Daily Mail, Daily Mirror and Daily Express.

The “ban” also covers the papers’ Sunday editions.

The Sussexes say they are starting a “a new media relations policy”.

They say the four tabloids have constantly printed invasive and distorted stories about them.

The letter adds:

“It is gravely concerning that an influential slice of the media, over many years, has sought to insulate themselves from taking accountability for what they say or print — even when they know it to be distorted, false, or invasive beyond reason.

“When power is enjoyed without responsibility, the trust we all place in this much-needed industry is degraded.”

The “new policy” means the tabloids will not receive updates and photographs of Harry and Meghan.

They could be barred from attending media events – a move that has always been difficult to implement.

The is keen to point out the policy is not about avoiding criticism or shutting down public conversation or censoring accurate reporting.

It says: “Media have every right to report on and indeed have an opinion on the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, good or bad.

“But it can’t be based on a lie.”

Since their marriage, the Sussexes have fought numerous battles with the press over its coverage of their private lives.

Last year Prince Harry compared the media’s relentless pursuit of his mother Diana to how Meghan was being treated.

He said: “I lost my mother and now I watch my wife falling victim to the same powerful forces.”

The letter says:

“It is gravely concerning that an influential slice of the media, over many years, has sought to insulate themselves from taking accountability for what they say or print – even when they know it to be distorted, false, or invasive beyond reason.

“When power is enjoyed without responsibility, the trust we all place in this much-needed industry is degraded.

“There is a real human cost to this way of doing business and it affects every corner of society.

“The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have watched people they know – as well as complete strangers – have their lives completely pulled apart for no good reason, other than the fact that salacious gossip boosts advertising revenue.

“With that said, please note that the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will not be engaging with your outlet.

“There will be no corroboration and zero engagement.

“This is also a policy being instated for their communications team, in order to protect that team from the side of the industry that readers never see.

“This policy is not about avoiding criticism.

“It’s not about shutting down public conversation or censoring accurate reporting.

“Media have every right to report on and indeed have an opinion on the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, good or bad.

“But it can’t be based on a lie.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


About the Author

Philip Braund spent 16 years at the Daily Mirror as a reporter and news editor before moving to ITV. He was the series producer of the ground-breaking investigation programme The Cook Report, Managing Editor at ITV's Millbank Studios, and Head of News at ITV Central. He has won national and regional Royal Television Society awards for documentaries.



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