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Putin and his generals should 'share same fate as Nazis', says UK defence secretary, ahead of Russia's Victory Day

The Ukraine invasion was as much a result of Russian military leaders as President Vladimir Putin. Both should be held accountable, according to the UK defense secretary.

Today’s major speech will see Ben Wallace speak out and say that Mr Vladimir and his circle of friends should suffer the same fate as Nazis who were defeated and faced the Nuremberg Trials for their atrocities.

This comes as Putin prepares to hold a military parade in Russia to commemorate Victory Day, which marks the victory of Hitler’s fascists.

Sky News has obtained extracts from Mr Wallace’s speech. He said: “Through their invasion Ukraine ,” Putin and his inner circle and generals have now mirrored the fascism of 70 years ago and are repeating the mistakes of the totalitarian regimes of the last century.”

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He’ll add, “Their fate must also be, surely, eventually the same.”

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How have the battles for Kyiv been played out?


Key developments:

* The evacuation efforts for Mariupol’s steel plant are continuing

* G7 leaders reiterated their support for Ukraine during a video conference, a sign of unity just before Russia’s Victory Day holiday.

* UK announces new Russia sanctions aimed at PS1.7bn worth trade

* The US First Lady Jill Biden visits western Ukraine unannounced and shares an intimate embrace with Olena Zelenskyy, her Ukrainian counterpart.

* The daughters of Paul Urey (a British aid worker) tell Sky News that they are “preparing to the worst.”

* Bono performs in a Metro Station in Kyiv to show solidarity


“They should be court-martialled”

He will address his audience at London’s National Army Museum before saying: “Their illegal and unprovoked invasion of Ukraine, attacks on innocent citizens and their houses, and the widespread atrocities, including against women and children, corrupts the memory and Russia’s once-proud international reputation.”

He will also criticise Russian commanders’ behaviour for war crimes, and their incompetence during a campaign that has failed to secure Mr Putin’s gains. He said the generals wearing their “manicured parade outfits” were “utterly complicit” in Putin’s “stomping on their proud history of resisting fascism.

Wallace will add that “all professional soldiers should be appalled by the behavior of the Russian army.”

“They are not only involved in illegal invasions and war crimes but their top brass have failed to their rank and file to such an extent that they should be sentenced.”

Image A Ukrainian officer watches over a young refugee at the Azovstal steel mill in Mariupol

After another day of relentless attacks on Ukraine, the defence secretary will speak.

After a Russian bomb exploded at a school , in eastern Ukraine, at least 60 people were believed to have been killed under rubble.

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The aftermath of the Russian bombing at school

Nearly 100 others were hiding in the building when it was attacked, setting off a fire that engulfed the entire structure.

In Mariupol’s southern port, the Ukrainian fighters at Azovstal Steel Plant have pledged to keep their fight alive.

Captain Sviatoslav Palmar, deputy commander of Ukraine’s Azov Regiment, stated that “We will continue fighting as long as it is possible to repel the Russian occupiers.” He spoke at an online conference.

Image Azovstal Steel Works has been pounded for several days

However, some insiders had voiced criticisms at the Ukrainian government for not defending Mariupol more effectively at the beginning of the invasion.

When Sky’s defence and security editor Deborah Haynes asked about it, Volodymyr Zelenskyy, the Ukrainian President, stated that his troops could not use military force without additional heavy weapons to break down the standoff.

He stated that Ukraine does not possess heavy weapons sufficient to deblock Mariupol using military means.

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Sky’s Deborah Haynes questions Zelenskyy

Although hundreds of people were initially held captive in the plant for more than two months, around 200 managed to escape. Russians now control the city.

Leaders from the Group of Seven (G7) made a promise on Sunday that they would ban or phase out the importation of Russian oil.

The G7 countries which include Japan, Britain, Canada and Germany said that cutting off Russian oil supplies would “hit hard at Putin’s main artery and deprive him of the revenue he needs for his war.”

They added that they would ensure that this happens in a timely, orderly manner and that there is enough time for the world’s supply of alternative supplies.

Continue reading:

Eyewitness – Searching for relatives in the rubble at Borodyanka

What does the letter Z mean in Russia?

How Russia was stopped from invading the United States

Follow the Daily podcast on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts. Spotify, Spreaker, Spotify.

The US announced additional sanctions against Russia, including the removal of Western advertising from Russia’s three largest television stations and the ban on US accounting and consulting firms providing services to Russian clients. There are also restrictions on Russia’s industrial sector.

This included cutting off Moscow from wood products and industrial engines, boilers, and bulldozers.

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